Is Organic really Organic?

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This is a question that often comes up as there are so many products that are stated as organic.  The question is how can you as a consumer know what you're buying is truly organic?

For Sew For Good and me personally this is where certification comes into it and why it's so important.  This doesn't always need to mean GOTS certification as there are a number of other trustworthy authorities however GOTS for me is still the pinnacle as it looks at more than just the environmental aspects but also addresses the social aspects of processing and garment manufacturing looking through the entire supply chain.

Firstly why is Organic important?  If you're on my site you probably already understand why and I'm preaching to the converted however if still in doubt Organic is important as we need to follow processes that limit the impact on the environment by reducing water, energy and pollutes including chemicals.  Organic processes do this and certification entities have their criteria that must be meet.  Studies have shown that more sustainable processes offer significant environmental benefits.  As reported on an article on the Common Objective website "A lifecycle analysis of organic cotton published in 2016 found that organic cotton had half the global warming potential of conventional cotton, 91 per cent less use of fresh water from lakes and streams and approximately a third of the demand for energy".  This is a huge benefit and can't be highlighted enough to show the importance of organic farming.

This second part to GOTS in regards to the social impact is so important as also reported on the Common Objective which inspired this port is 90% of cotton farmers are in low-income countries and the cotton industry is an economic mainstay providing work and income for around 350 million people.

So next time you look at that organic item you're buying - ask the question, is it truly organic and how can they prove it?

Rebecca 

certification gots organic

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